Friday, 5 June 2015

THE HERO IN A MIDWIFE

Every life starts at the time of delivery, regardless of whether one will be a president, a rich business personality, ordinary person with a survival job or even pauper. For a baby to survive its first few hours of life, its survival depends upon the kind of maternal care a mother is given during the birth process. While this would seem an ideal scenario in many parts of the world, many mothers in Uganda never enjoy the benefits of having a skillful and highly trained midwife to guarantee their survival and the life of their newborn child.


At a rate of 20 women dying daily during pregnancy and the labour process, of which 42% of the expecting mothers are young women who usually face a higher risk of birth complications that require the skills of a well-trained midwife to handle. Uganda faces a major crisis that calls for immediate intervention.

The Millennium Development Goal 4 aims at improving child health, including that of newborns, while the Millennium Development Goal 5 aims at improving maternal health. These two global objectives can only be achieved if each country invests enough resources into training more midwives, especially in developing countries like Uganda.

The need for midwives is greater than ever before the nation’s history. Unfortunately, many people have not paid attention to the crucial role midwives play in Uganda. This is largely because of the fact that generally people lack accurate information on the significance of having qualified midwives attend to every expecting mother in the country.

Midwives are trained to support expecting mothers in a wide range of circumstances, including abnormal complications in the delivery process. They work tirelessly every day, 7 days a week and 12 months a year to ensure all the expecting mothers within their reach have safe deliveries. On top of facilitating a safe delivery for a mother, midwives go ahead to assist mothers in breastfeeding in an effort to prevent transmission of HIV from mother to child and advise mothers on safe newborn care and family planning services. These remarkable abilities portrayed by midwives are expedited by the intense training they undergo in order to acquire these essential skills.

As the need for midwives increases in Uganda and in the world, a lot has to be done to address this vital deficit. The field of midwifery requires the strength, knowledge and zeal of the young people so as to give it a major boost in terms of man power and efficiency. Midwifery should be branded, not as a stressful occupation for only those that are not academically brilliant though love medical studies, but rather a desirable career path that brings joy as one constantly works towards safeguarding all mothers to enjoy a safe delivery. Men too, have a key role to play by supporting their wives throughout the 9 months of labour till the final day when the baby is delivered. This serves to appreciate both their wives and the midwives who fight hard to sustain the life of their wives and guarantee the birth of the newborn babies.

 The Midwives4All campaign aims at giving every mother the dream of having a safe delivery with a healthy baby through advocating for need for more midwives to ensure every mother  is attended to by a qualified and well trained midwife. Every mother deserves a right to a safe delivery, only a qualified midwife can guarantee that right for every mother.
 (Image credit to www.midwive4all.orgwww.who.int www.huffingtonpost.co.uk and africanwomanmagazine.net)




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